EFE | By Lourdes Velasco Madrid

The team of specialists searching for the remains of Miguel de Cervantes in Madrid's Church of the Trinitarian Sisters are cautiously encouraged by the discovery of a burial niche with what appears to be the initials of Don Quixote's creator on it.

The discoverty is certainly an "impressive" one, archaeologist Almudena Garcia Rubio told Efe Monday, but said caution was the wisest course since the work on identifying the contents "has just started" and is proceeding "slowly"

 
  • A view of the fachade of Trinitarias Convent in downtown Madrid, Spain, 26 January 2015, where a coffin with the initials 'M.C.' was found yesterday d
  • A view of the fachade of Trinitarias Convent in downtown Madrid, Spain, 26 January 2015, where a coffin with the initials 'M.C.' was found yesterday d
 
A view of the fachade of Trinitarias Convent in downtown Madrid, Spain, 26 January 2015, where a coffin with the initials 'M.C.' was found yesterday d
A view of the fachade of Trinitarias Convent in downtown Madrid, Spain, 26 January 2015, where a coffin with the initials 'M.C.' was found yesterday during the forensic and anthropological labour to find Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes' human remains. Almost 400 years after the death of Cervantes, experts try to find his remains inside the Trinitarias convent. The author of Don Quixote, who died on 22 April 1616, asked for being buried inside convent and some experts doubt his wish was fulfilled. Nobody knows exactly where Cervantes mortal remains could rest after the building was restorated several times. EFE/Angel Diaz
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