efe-epaBy Javier Romualdo Washington

Jacqueline Kennedy (1929-1994) was an unforgettable personality in the history of the United States in the 20th century and is now particularly remembered in the nation's capital on the 25th anniversary of her death.

The few Washington natives who have lived through the comings and goings of this turbulent metropolis, the real Washingtonians, remember how the Kennedys imparted a sense of glamour and the good life to the capital.

One place that continues to attract visitors day by day is Martin's Tavern, where President John F. Kennedy proposed to Jackie at a dinner on June 24, 1953.

She was working as a journalist for the media in Washington and had just covered the coronation of Elizabeth II, queen of England.

The tavern, opened in 1933 when the "dry law" of prohibition was repealed, was John's favorite place. When he was a congressman he lived just a few blocks away.

Today, more than 50 years after that dinner, thousands of tourists come every year to sit at the table where the couple promised to marry.

With wooden benches and glass lamps, it's a place where time stands still, and which illustrates with plaques and photos that it was the setting where a marriage was pledged that inspired the nation.

"Many couples come here to get engaged. They call to reserve a table and let it be known they will ask of each other's hand in marriage. Sometimes they ask for a romantic dinner at 7:00 pm and I tell them they can't come at that time because it's already reserved for another couple," Chrissy, one of the tavern's managers, told EFE.

Various generations of Kennedys have also dined at this establishment: their daughter Caroline was there in 2009 and 2010, and their grandson Jack in 2016.

Those who are passionate or just curious about the Kennedys take a tour of the properties they occupied in Washington, apart from the obvious White House.

A tourist who was taking photos of the door of one of their properties went afterwards to the Holy Trinity Catholic Church, the oldest in all Washington, where the couple used to attend Mass.

An "In Memoriam" plaque at the entrance recalls to all the faithful that this was the place that John went to Mass for the last time in the capital before his tragic assassination.

After her husband's death, Jackie lived in Washington for just one year. For security reasons, the US government asked her to leave her home and she moved to New York.

Another place where visitors go is the tomb of Jackie next to that of her husband in one of the most famous spots in Arlington National Cemetery.