efe-epaSana'a

Yemeni civilians, including women and children, who have been injured in recent airstrikes allegedly launched by the Saudi-led international coalition were on Wednesday receiving medical treatment at a hospital in the capital Sana'a, an epa-efe photojournalist reported.

According to a United Nations statement citing medical sources, at least 22 people have died in a spate of attacks on residential areas on Monday and Tuesday in Yemen's northwestern Hajjah province.

The strikes claimed the lives of 12 children and 10 women in the Kushar district, the UN said, while about 30 other people were injured, among them 14 civilians under the age of 18.

Many of the child victims had been hospitalized, while "several require possible evacuation to survive," the UN statement added.

Mustafa al-Hadi, who had injured family members and was visiting two of his sisters who were receiving treatment at the 48 Hospital in Sana'a, told epa that he lost relatives in the airstrikes.

"Three families had moved to our house to escape clashes in the area of Kushar, where our house was far from the clashes between Houthis and the Saudi coalition-backed forces," he said.

"There were no military forces nearby, but they were surprised by an airstrike which struck next to the house," he continued.

He said none of the occupants of the house were injured and those who had been inside fled the building and headed out into the countryside and mountains to look for safety.

Al-Hadi said his family of 19 people fled to a neighbor's house, "but a new airstrike hit the house."

"While people were trying to get the victims out of the rubble, they were targeted by another airstrike, preventing medical personnel from reaching the wounded," he added.

He said he lost 12 relatives in the strikes, while seven other family members were injured.

Yemen has been engulfed in a violent conflict between forces loyal to the Saudi-backed Yemeni government and Houthi rebels for the past four years.

The UN has described the crisis gripping the nation as the world's worst humanitarian crisis.